Pura Belpré Award
2010

Medal Winner for Narrative

Return to Sender by Julia Alvarez YA ALV
Julia Alvarez explores the thin line that separates American citizens and undocumented persons in her brilliantly told novel, “Return to Sender.” After Tyler’s father is unable to maintain the family farm, he hires undocumented workers, resulting in an interdependent relationship that mirrors current social and political conditions in the United States. Alvarez humanizes a situation by giving a voice to millions of immigrants experiencing similar hardships. This outstanding novel about the solidarity between two children of different cultures will resonate in the hearts of readers of any age.

Medal Winner for Illustration

Book Fiesta!: Celebrate Children’s Day/Book Day; Celebremos El día de los niños/El día de los libros illustrated by Rafael López, written by Pat Mora J E AWARD Mora, P.
In “Book Fiesta!: Celebrate Children’s Day/Book Day; Celebremos El día de los niños/El día de los libros,” Rafael López utilizes vibrant colors and applies magical realism to show that the love of reading is universal. Through a series of fanciful images, the author depicts Latino children inviting children of other cultures into their book fiesta, leading the reader on a visual journey that shows that reading sparks the imagination across all cultures and has the power to unite us.

Honor Books for Narrative

Diego: Bigger Than Life by Carmen T. Bernier-Grand, illustrated by David Diaz J 921 RIVERA, D., Ber
Diego Rivera's energy, physique, love for women, and work were all "bigger than life." Born in a small Mexican mining town in 1886, he drew his way through childhood, entered art school at age
ten, and later traveled throughout Europe, studying the great masters and
imitating their techniques. When he returned to Mexico in 1921, he found
his own unique style. He began painting the poetry of the common people --
working, suffering, fighting, seeking joy, living, and dying -- on the
walls of public buildings. His murals were passionate, controversial, political,
and enormous -- like the painter himself.

Federico García Lorca  by Georgina Lázaro, illustrated by Enrique S. Moreiro J Spanish E LAZ
Lázaro re-casts the lives of the great Latin-American literary masters through poetic verse in this exciting series. In the first book, her poetry is particularly acute in capturing the symbols from García Lorca' childhood that he later wrote about in his poems for children: the lizard, the red bird, the cricket, and the frog, as well as the games and songs of early childhood growing up in small agricultural towns in the province of Granada, Spain. Moreiro' vibrant tempera paints on panels and illustration boards convey the tranquility of place as well as the calm and gentle nature of Spain' beloved poet. This is an excellent introduction to Lorca' life and a perfect companion to Federico García Lorca para niños (Susaeta Ediciones, S.A. 1999), issued for the García Lorca' centennial. In the second title, Lázaro' poetry is eloquent and dramatic and provides essential elements of Borges' childhood immersed in a world of fantasy and imagination. Privately tutored at home in his native Argentina until the age of nine, he also spent countless hours engaged in free play and listening to stories read in English by his British grandmother. Genovés' glowing watercolors complement Borges' eccentric nature, particularly his obsession with tigers, a leif motif used in some of his short stories

Honor Books for Illustration

Diego: Bigger Than Life by Carmen T. Bernier-Grand, illustrated by David Diaz J 921 RIVERA, D., Ber
Diego Rivera's energy, physique, love for women, and work were all "bigger than life." Born in a small Mexican mining town in 1886, he drew his way through childhood, entered art school at age
ten, and later traveled throughout Europe, studying the great masters and
imitating their techniques. When he returned to Mexico in 1921, he found
his own unique style. He began painting the poetry of the common people --
working, suffering, fighting, seeking joy, living, and dying -- on the
walls of public buildings. His murals were passionate, controversial, political,
and enormous -- like the painter himself.

Gracias Thanks illustrated by John Parra, written by Pat Mora J PICTURE BOOK MOR
"Gracias * Thanks" is a bilingual children's story told in poetic phrases of wonderful things for which a boy gives thanks. Written in Spanish and English and beautifully illustrated with full two-page spread mural-like pictures, "Gracias * Thanks" is the perfect book to give any child between 4 and 9 for Thanksgiving or any other holiday. Reading it together will help both the child and parent/caretaker feel the deep awareness of gratitude for all of life's varied experiences.




My Abuelita illustrated by Yuyi Morales, written by Tony Johnston J PICTURE BOOK JOH
Abuelita's hair is the color of salt. Her face is as crinkled as a dried chile. She booms out words as wild as blossoms blooming. She stuffs her carcacha--her jalopy--with all the things she needs: a plumed snake, a castle, a skeleton, and more. Her grandson knows he has the most amazing grandmother ever--with a very important job. What does Abuelita do? With her booming voice and wonderful props, Abuelita is a storyteller. Next to being a grandmother, that may be the most important job of all. Sprinkled with Spanish and infused with love, My Abuelita is a glorious celebration of family, imagination, and the power of story.